Best of Yazd: From getting lost in the quiet alleyways to enjoying the view from the rooftops

Yazd is oldest city in the world and to get to know it a visitor needs to see it from all angles

Alleyway in Yazd

The adobe alleyways in the old city  keep the dwellings protected from the sun, large vehicles out and water fresh and cool below.   My visit started on a thursday after noon and ended a couple of days afterwards.  It is considered the weekend here and it was quiet for the most part.   The  doorway found along the alleyways are modest entrances to the beautiful homes which lie behind. They traditionally  contain a courtyard filled with plants and a pool of water and have rooms circulating around it.

Doorway in Yazd
Doorway in Old Yazd

Plenty was open and available to see since the weekends are times when families spend time together and also visit tourist sites. We arrived in the late afternoon on thursday. We got to see a couple of sites before getting a bite to eat at the Silk Road Hotel. The food was pretty good there. The standard menu of kebab, Kookoo Zabzi, Rice, salad and Doogh. Fridays get pretty quiet here. Most activity ceases until after the evening prayer. At least we can find a place to get a cold drink as we explore the empty bazaar.

Bazaar on a Friday in Yazd
Bazaar on a Friday in Yazd

We left Sunday and found out that this was a good choice since most shops are closed in this conservative town. This includes the famous Haj Khalife Ali Rahbar Confectionary Shop near the Amir Chakhmaq square. I luckily got to it on Saturday and bought my 1/2 kilo of Qottab – it’s sort of like Mexican Wedding cookies with cardamom.

Pastries at Haj Khalifeh Rahbar's shop
Pastries at Haj Khalifeh Rahbar’s shop

Our days were filled with visiting mosques in town; visiting Zoroastrian landmarks; taking day trips to the UNESCO sites of Chak-Chak and Kharanaq; and eating and sleeping in between. Yazd is definitely on the list of places to come back to when revisiting again in the future.

Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Sunrise in front of the Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Courtyard of the Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Inside the Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Masjed-i Jamé mosque
Iwan of the Masjed-i Jamé mosque
View of Jameh Mosque from Orient Hotel
View of Jameh Mosque from Orient Hotel in Yazd

5 thoughts on “Best of Yazd: From getting lost in the quiet alleyways to enjoying the view from the rooftops

  1. Steve Wood January 17, 2012 / 7:35 pm

    Hey guys, May be the U.S. far much better off sticking to Syria’s Assad?

  2. farflungistan January 18, 2012 / 11:01 am

    I’m not sure about that. Syria and Iran are both countries looking to keep control of their people. The populations of both are tired of being suppressed and want change. I hope they soon have a brighter future and all the fighting and killing stops soon for everyones sake. I have a feeling it’s going to be a long struggle for both nations.

  3. Eileen Stanton February 11, 2012 / 9:54 am

    Wow, your blog is extremely fascinating!

  4. the wanderer March 11, 2012 / 12:29 am

    Yazd is one of my favorite cities. While it does not have a lot of sights, wandering around the old town, getting lost and checking out some of the heritage hotels is an experience in itself!

  5. farflungistan March 11, 2012 / 11:16 am

    I was there on the weekend so many things were closed. Luckily, the Hajj Khalifeh Rahbar Confections Shop was open one of my days. (I’m a pastry chef) The coin museum was also a lot more interesting then it sounds. The building itself was more beautiful then the popular Water Museum minus the crowds. Our stay was short and there were many alleyways and sites that we weren’t able to get to. Next time 🙂

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